Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Clay & Poetry

Today I am participating for the first time at dVerse Poets. Basically, this is how it works. The dVerse team offers a poetry prompt. You write a poem and post it on your blog and link to them (with the Mr. Linky button). Then you can visit other participants blogs and see what ideas they came up with, and they in turn can read what you created.

This week's prompt is to write a poem based on one (or more) of the several painting shown by Judith Clay. Let me say, I love art. I love collage. I love original styles. A bit of funk and fantasy. Judith's work is all of these things. That caused a bit of a problem. I was taken in by all the paintings and, therefore, couldn't decide which one to choose for my poem. Eventually, I got overwhelmed with reasoning and just did "eeny-meeny, miney, mo". Seriously. I did. And I ended up with the very first picture--Henry and Adele. Isn't it beautiful?                                   

Henry & Adele, by Judith Clay
Here's  what I came up with (while half asleep...next time I'll need to do the eeny-meeny-method right away).

Henry's Lullaby

Sitting on the hilltop,a boy with ringlets of hair
darker than the night curls fingers around a flute,
his breath transforming to notes of nightingale.
A nearby mourning dove spreads his feathers,
whistles wings and coos to the tranquil tunes.

Up above, waning Luna, a silver-slivered jewel
in the sapphire sky, listens. Somniferous songs
bring visions of a river that gently rolls along
to the melody. Tiny black boats transport fruit
and letters as moon surrenders to the surrealism
of sleep shortly before the sun's reappearance.


You would think that since I am writing a poem everyday this month for the August Postcard Poetry Fest that this would be an easy task. It wasn't. Unfortunately, I find ekphrastic poetry difficult sometimes, especially if I like the work. I get so caught up in the art that I forgot to produce words. So don't ever expect genius from me with ekphrastic. It is usually just a description of what I see.  Not much thinking outside the box on this one. But I did it and I wrote my postcard poem for today as well. I hope the practice I am getting each day this month helps me get the creative juices flowing again.

If you would like to see more of Judith's amazing art, CLICK HERE to go to her Society6 Shop. I also found more of here work shown at Blue Canvas.  Oh, and did I mention that she is German? How cool is that! And I think she lives in Baden W├╝rttemberg, too. Maybe one day I'll walk into an art exhibit somewhere and see her work displayed. And if I am not mistake, she has a children's book coming out soon. At least I think I read that somewhere. If I find the information I will add a link.

To take part in this week's poetry prompt at dVerse, CLICK HERE. Or to learn more about dVerse visit their This is Us page.

As always, thanks for stopping by Lind-guistics. If you want me to know you've been here, leave a comment. 

28 comments:

Linda H. said...

Darn! Apparently I missed the Mr. Linky link deadline. I didn't know there was one. :-(

writingonthesun said...

No worries. There will be more. I love Judith's images,too. This line of yours was nice: "his breath transforming to notes of nightingale" Welcome to dVerse. I'm kind of new, too.
-J.lynn

Claudia said...

nice...cool that you jumped in with your poem -
i like the Somniferous songs bringing vision..a song def. can bring vision and touch deeply...love the river as well dancing and rolling along to the melody...
if you like you can link this up for OpenLinkNight which starts at 9pm german time today - there's no specific theme and the piece would get a few more readers..so would be cool seeing you there...and welcome at dVerse..smiles

Susie Clevenger said...

"Tiny black boats transport fruit
and letters as moon surrenders to the surrealism
of sleep shortly before the sun's reappearance." Love this Linda!! Great poem!!

Susie Clevenger said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Misky said...

My ipad chokes on your blog. Won't post a comment. Very odd. But enough of that -- your poem is splendid, Linda. Don't underestimate this one because I'm very fond of it. :)

~ Misky

De said...

Love this, Linda. I'm especially lulled by this:
"whistles wings and coos to the tranquil tunes."

Just so lovely.

De said...

And so happy to see you over at dVerse! :)

Linda H. said...

Thanks, JLS.

Linda H. said...

Thank you for your kind comments and the idea. Yep. I think I'll just link this to the OpenLinkNight.

Linda H. said...

Thanks. That means a lot coming from you, Susie.

Linda H. said...

I deleted this comment, because it was identical to the one above.

Linda H. said...

Well, this posted.

Thanks, Misky.

Linda H. said...

Thank you, De.

Laurie Kolp said...

Somniferous songs... I just love that, Linda. I'm so happy to see you at dVerse!!

Linda H. said...

Thanks for leading me there, Laurie.

manicddaily said...

I also have a problem with ekphrastic poems--but you've described and amplified the picture in lovely ways - especially with the tunrefullness of nightingale and mourning dove. Lovely. k.

Brian Miller said...

welcome to dverse...nice soothing verse...there is an ease to your words...i like that it is the music which brings visions of the boats as well...and the moon succumbs to the surreality...smiles.

liv2write2day said...

Linda, so happy to welcome you to dVerse. Your imagery is beautiful, makes the painting come alive. I enjoy Judith's art and the work it's produced. Hope to see you more often at dVerse. Tomorrow the prompt will be to edit an old poem that doesn't work. Victoria

Buddah Moskowitz said...

I didn't even know what somniferous meant, and I usually hate when poets use big words, but in this case, it didn't matter: the poem was so well don, it just moved along sweetly - looked up somniferous later and it was the perfect word. Thanks.

Unknown said...

Welcome to dVerse Poets. I joined just a few months back and have learnt so much from these guys. Only sadness is that I don't always have time to read and comment on all of the poems. Ekphrastic poems are hard, you are right. The best definition of it comes from a poet friend of mine, who said: You have to find a way to convey how what you see changes you.

findingtimetowrite said...

Sorry, don't know why it's made me Unknown. Blogger doesn't like Wordpress and vice versa. My name is Marina Sofia.

gabriellaswritingcorner said...

I like the "Somniferous songs"! Lovely tone throughout.

Pat Hatt said...

Nice verse and you'll have fun, as dVerse surely has much to be spun

Mary said...

Very nice writing, Linda. I especially liked 'A nearby mourning dove spreads his feathers,
whistles wings and coos to the tranquil tunes' which really gave me a very vivid picture! Welcome to dVerse!

Joseph Philip Walters said...

Nice to find you dipping your toes into the water as well, as I have just gotten my feet wet myself. So far, it is a great experience, I think you'll enjoy it here, Linda.

Loving your interpretation of Judith Clay's painting. Hope to read more!

Poet Laundry said...

A lovely tranquility in your words. Nice work! And welcome at dVerse...I've found it to be a very welcoming and encouraging community of poets, glad you're here!

Madeleine Begun Kane said...

What a lovely poem and a wonderful companion verse for that image.

Madeleine Begun Kane